Studio Group Portraits - Behind the Shot

Recent clients including a married couple and a mother-in-law stop into the studio for some portraits... Group, couple and individual shots.

Here's how I went about capturing them.

--------------------------------------

One of the "final" pics.

One of the "final" pics.

1. Before the shoot...

Now my studio space being of a modest size, but surrounded in white walls and a large window I decide to put my subjects on a bench at first for some comfortable sit down portraits. The bench is located about 8-10 inches away from the white wall acting as the background.

3E5A9149.jpg

The next step, position my lighting.

Now, you definitely can do natural lighting (there are some final shots with just that) but I wanted some really nice and evenly lit portraits at least at first. I want them to have that clean white background. I take my large 60" Photek Umbrella with diffusion and place it opposite of the window and facing slightly away from the subjects as to feather the light and allow bounce around the room for that even look.

Now with that placed I look to fill in the slight shadows left. I use the small section of wall in between the window and the background wall to bounce a small speedlight source, making it much larger and softer than a plain head on shot from the speedlight. 

In this first shot, I have the speedlight positioned and take a test shot... I notice that the size of the bounce is not as big as it could be, I reposition the head and aim it up slightly for much more coverage.

Screenshot from Adobe Lightroom to help illustrate the spread of light using the highlights alert function. Notice how the red spotlight is much bigger with just a slight aim difference.


The Shoot...

After greeting my subjects, offering them a water, ask if the heat is ok (Shot in December)... I approach this group shot as I would a larger event like a wedding party. Start with everyone, then branch off into groups as no one likes to be the first victim and you can also group people back together after they are more warmed up so to speak.

I have this giant white bench normally used as my waiting, bag, purse holder. I use this as a easy first shot telling them just act like they are on a park bench of sorts, relaxed, no pressure, and I show them the results of the first few shots.

Next up...

I take the husband away and grab some shots of the mother/daughter. (Always be conscientious of your clients comfort level, I had this group next to give the mother a rest as she was elderly.)

Same lighting, I just move slightly closer and zoom in from around 45-50mm to about 60-65mm.

Working with families, non professionals etc etc, you will have things occur like breaking eye contact with the camera, fading attention and people will look at each other. Let em! It's all good and you will get some sweet moments in between. I will say that a quick "ok, eyes on me" will work once or twice but don't badger your subject, and also do not be silent Just let the mood flow, redirect as needed and give feedback. When you see something you like, a pose, a moment, say "oh that", "yes I like that" something small and positive. 

Next Up...

I grab my other model and swap him in. I give my cushion office chair to the mother and have her sit on camera right.

Same settings, same focal lengths basically. Now my subjects have been together for years and they are totally comfortable with each other, I guide them a tad with some standing position choices and let them have at it, only mentioning when to repeat a certain something.

*Note: These images, two of them are "cut off". Absolutely and my fault, i was chimping (not recommended all the time) and looking a images on the screen, then has this cute moment and I raised and shot and just cropped out the full shot. I keep them though because it still works, there is a great mood there. 

Next and last for this post I take some single images. This type of shoot is tricky because I am not a great poser (hehe... Poser)... But I do love it when my subjects are calm and comfortable. I grab some stools then, one tall and one short, I have them pick and position themselves. This serving the purpose of getting them in a position where in their head naturally comes forward giving emphasis on the face and two it gives a natural placement for the hands.

Same Light, same settings, I zoom in and out for the best composition ranging from 40-55mm.

Take Aways...

Editing was very light, only some highlight correction, lens correction, slight cropping and a bit of sharpening.


Gear Used

Canon 5D Mark IV

Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II

Flashpoint R2 Pro Remote Trigger

Xplor 600 Monolight

Photek 60" Umbrella

Yongnuo YN600EX-RT Speedlight

Impact C-Stand with Arm

Sand Bags!

And if you are interested in purchasing any of these, please follow the links here, it will help me out Thanks!

__________________________

Now, have any questions? Feedback? Hit me up! 

Either in the comments,  email me at Logan@.Lmsorenson.net or find me social media! @Lmsorenson

Until then...

Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

Portrait of a Sixth Grader - Behind the shot

Recently I had the opportunity to take some portraits of a creative and stylish young lady, a sixth grader. He mom and I picked a date and time, I had them come to my new studio space and here is some information on how my mind works before, during and after a shoot.

Portrait of a Sixth Grader

Portrait of a Sixth Grader

1. The Space 

Now, the space available to shoot in is a smaller studio space with hard floors, white walls and one big window. 

We pick the wall just next to the window and decide to shoot with ambient light since it is sunny and strobe lighting is not really needed.

2. TheShoot

Now how do you interact with the subject? How do you interact with any subject?

Make the subject feel comfortable, confident.

Now, my subject being a sixth grader, there isn't much on the table that we can talk about. But wait, her mother said she picked out her outfit, picked out her hat, that she loves hats. So... I tell her that I really like her hat! Her face lights up, she is grateful that I said something, I look back and forth between her and her mother asking about themselves, their interests. And when there is a lull in the conversation, I take a shot.

Now, the trouble with any shoot, any interaction really. How to make the interaction flow, how to avoid pauses, avoid the awkwardness to creep in. As I will be the first to admit, I am not the best at this, I am not. I try... But I am bad, but here are a few tips and I used some in this shoot.


a. Relate to your model or subject. Now with my subject being a sixth grader there isn't too much under the sun that we can relate to but, I did remember her mother saying that she picked out her own outfit for the shoot, picked out each piece including her hat and that she loves hats. So I took that, I was honest and I told her that I really liked her hat... Boom! Her face lights up enough to know that she will be good with a few shots. I add on to that by saying that colors she picked really look cool against the white walls of the studio. And we take some more shots.

3E5A8772.jpg

b. Talk to your subject, ask them about themselves and keep it going. I took the small breaks from changing settings, using the tripod, adjust my feet and I asked my model and her mother about themselves. I was able to find out that in fact she was a 6th grade student at a local school (which I had not known until then), that her mother is a teacher at a school that was known to me ever since I was little. I learned that she is an only child, she is creative, she loves creating things and she has been practicing posing in the mirror at home before the shoot! 

She was sitting in my chair as we took a break and I saw from the corner of my eye that she was doing this simple, cool, super relaxed pose. I told her to wheel herself over and we were going to do that again.

She was sitting in my chair as we took a break and I saw from the corner of my eye that she was doing this simple, cool, super relaxed pose. I told her to wheel herself over and we were going to do that again.

c. Encourage your subject! Is there a look, a pose a face that caught your eye? Say something! "Oh what you did just there"..."That thing you did with the hat"..."How you put your arm there"... Giving this feedback is not only nice to hear from their perspective but is great for you because it will reinforce the looks you are going for, they will grow from that and learn as the shoot goes. Makes it better for everyone.

Silly face 2 of 3 in the quick series for best faces.

Silly face 2 of 3 in the quick series for best faces.

d. You can be silly. No saying this has two parts to it. One, you do not want to be a clown, a character you are not and just make the shoot zany. Two, you do want to keep relating to your model. You are no longer asking them about themselves... But with a quick "Ok... Let's try some silly faces" and telling them to pick there best 3 silly faces, it can lighten the mood just for a sec, gets them to open up and you can get some great informal shots from it. 

Close up

Close up

3. Really it all comes down to relations... Interactions... We all have them everyday with strangers and friends alike. This is no different except two things; that you are both trying to ease this new person to you that stranger in their day, and while also trying to be creative, to bring them into your artistic headspace and try to create something without it being a completely cerebral one sided experience. And it is hard, we have to practice, we have to have an idea of what we want and find a way to get there.

That being said, every client is different, every subject is different, whether it is a professional, amature... A team with three days of prep or one man operation with a half hour shoot as in this case. You adapt, you be yourself and you get it done.

What do you think? - Is there anything special you do during a photoshoot?

Shout it out in the comments, hit me up on Instagram, Facebook... Tweet me and lets keep the conversation going.

Until then...


Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

A Portrait of a Butcher - Beltex Meats

In this post I will share some information on how I went about getting some portraits of a local butcher for SLUG Magazine and their upcoming Food Issue.

GEAR USED AT THE END OF THIS POST!! 

BEFORE THE SHOOT...

An opportunity to photograph a local shop owner for a feature about their new shop? I am in!

The information I was given is that there was a new butcher shop and meat vendor in the downtown Salt Lake area, the owner is my subject, a time and an address. I am told I have about 15 minutes to take some shots before the shop opens.

I arrived 10 minutes early, I park in front of the shop, take out my C-Stand and attach it to the wheel base, grab my bag and I walk up to the shop's entrance. Since it was closed that means I have the pick of any location in inside to make my images, no customers will be shopping, just me and my subject.

THE SHOOT...

I meet my subject, owner/operator Butcher Philip Grubisa, shake his hand and ask him if I can take a look around the shop to find a good place for the portraits.

The interior of the shop is open, not too large and has about 12' white ceilings. (See Video)

I decide the use two display cases, one shorter case more towards the entrance and the other just on the other side of the pillar that is taller.

As with all indoor shoots, the light available might not be the best for a portrait and or might not be bright enough for a photo at all. The below image shows before the addition of flash at usable settings.

 

I have Phillip place himself on the side of the shorter display case a sort of seated lean, super casual. I do not use a direct light source for this shot, seeing the large glass case and the narrow walkway, getting the position of the light stand just right would be impossible. I opt to use a 7' reflector to direct the light from the strobe away from the subject and toward the ceiling, they are low enough and will reflect the light downward, spreading it evenly.

I grab these two shots...

I move onto the other side of the main beam in the room to work against the taller display case in the shop.

Turning my C-Stand and light so that it fired on the correct side of the ceiling beam like so...

Using a diferent angle by holding the 5D IV over head. I used the touch screen I was able to get these shots...

At last I bring the angle back down to a shoulder to eye level shot. I ask Philip if he has any meats we can grab and put on the counter next to him.

I leave the light as is, and we capture a few more shots.

AFTER THE SHOOT... 

My final shots being submitted and 


Gear Used

I take with me the following gear, please follow these links to see the product details and if you purchase from them through these links, it helps me out a bit. Thanks!

Canon 5D Mark IV

Canon 24-70 f/2.8 USM II

Xplor 600 Monolight with 7" Reflector

Impact C-Stand with arm

Kupo C-Stand Base with locking wheels

Neewer 43" Umbrella Softbox

Lowepro AW 200 Messenger Bag


Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Tumblr

Portrait of a Brewer Part 1 of 2 - Bonneville Brewery

Magazine issue featuring beer and the people that brew it? I am in... Here is a bts look on how I went about capturing portraits of head brewer Dave Watson at Bonneville Brewery. And Hoppers Grill (& Brewing Co.‘s Donovan Steele. in Part 2 of 2).

BEFORE THE SHOOT...

Before each shoot, I was told the date and time available to the perspective brewers to capture a portrait. I pack my lighting equipment and upon driving to each location and inspecting the shooting area available.

1st up... Bonneville Brewing

Upon arriving, parking in the rear of the restaurant/brewery and entering the loading door, the first room available being used for supply and storage (pictured). Not exactly what I am looking for but have to look around more. 

First room/entryway to the brewery area. Bonneville Brewing.

After getting past the next wall you are opened to a small staircase and then a room full of vats and a brewing equipment. I knew that this room was obviously the one to shoot in. 

Brewing vats, brewery floor. Bonneville Brewing.

Brewing vats, brewery floor. Bonneville Brewing.

THE SHOOT...

I tell the brewer I am going to set up my light and then place him in a couple spots for a shot.

I set up a small light stand and attach my speedlight, battery pack (for quick recycle) and place them in a 31.5" Octagon Umbrella Softbox.

I want to capture the range of the room, I only need 1 final shot to be used, but a variety is always the best route. I spot a huge vat where the by product is being shoveled out, the tall vats towards the rear window(pictured) and the row of shorter vats on my left.

20160426_1323251.jpg

I take a test shot as the brewer scrapes out the remnants of the vat, but instantly see that the overall composition is... A bit boring. I get to my knees for another shot and then climb a small set of stairs for the next, introducing more context and interest in the shot.

_MG_8781.jpg

Next shots, I want to include that sweet paddle, shovel tool that he was using. I ask him to strike a casual pose, only suggesting holding the tool or standing it to the side.

The tall vats in the rear are my first backgroud, and again I take a lower pov to accentuate the height and the glare off of the metal.

The next and final shot I move the brewer forward about ten feet and move myself to the right, I get a view of the row now behind my subject moving away, giving depth to the shot.

AFTER THE SHOOT...

I have my images that I need to submit for this new Beer Issue, I thank Dave for his time and pack up my things.

Here are the final result below.


GEAR USED

Canon 6D


BE SURE TO CHECK OUT Part 2 of 2!! With Brewer Donovan Stele from Hoppers Brewery. Coming soon!

http://www.slugmag.com/interviews-features/bonneville-bottles-beer-wall-hoppers-bottles-beer/

http://www.slugmag.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/330-June-64-Issue-Final_Web.pdf

http://www.slugmag.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/330-June-64-Issue-Final_Web.pdf

Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer 

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

Shooting Green Day - Some BTS and final results.

Green Day has been an almost household name ever since the 90's and their punk inspired garage rock sound infecting the ears of fans since.

The band returns to the Salt Lake City area to play a show at a local amphitheatre and I was lucky enough to be included in the photographers covering this show.

Below I have included some glimpses into my experience via Instagram Stories as well as my 'final product' for the publication I was shooting for.

The day was a mix of security, waiting, playing around.

There is always a line at seciurity, always arrive early.

Some venues, artists and tour personnel have rules about access before shows and in some cases strict camera out of the bag restrictions.

Just before the show is about to begin there is always a moment of a bunch of photographers just... Hanging around for a sec.

The crowd was more than harmoneous while singing part of Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody before the band took the stage.

Check out the gallery here!!

www.SlugMag.com  | @SLUGMAG 

Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer 

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

Farmer's Market - Testing the new Canon 6D Mark II

Having just upgraded my back up body from the Canon 6D to the newly released Canon 6D Mark II, I want to show how I took a few hours during the weekend to test this new body out... The Saturday Farmer's Market in Downtown SLC was the perfect opportunity.

I took my bike downtown with my plan: To capture as many portraits and images of people shopping, the wares available to display the capabilities of the new camera. 

The Farmer's Market, during a sunny day posts a great challenge for any camera as there is so much sunlight in mid day, scattered shade and lots of strong contrast from tent to tent. I use both manual mode, and aperture priority to get used to what the camera will set to. I use the swivel screen, touch focus, touch shutter, the only setting I leave alone is the metering mode, set to Center Weighted because the focus points are very much center weighted and would balance the subject in focus being appropriately exposed.

I jump right in treating this "test shoot" as I would any assignment by a publication for getting the overall energy of the scene with a mix of environment and portraits.


These images are all edited and presented as I would for online presentation (i.e. gallery, website, local news, social media, etc.)


I take some shots of the first tents wares.

ISO 320 - 50mm - f/4 - 1/1250 - AV

ISO 320 - 50mm - f/4 - 1/1250 - AV

ISO 320 - 41mm - f/4.0 - 1/80 - AV

ISO 320 - 41mm - f/4.0 - 1/80 - AV

So far I really am liking the colors, the amount of detail and the focus nailed by the live view dual pixel auto focus.

Continuing on...  I approach some vendors as I walk down the road.

The very sweet Linda Hart of Linda Hart Designs - www.LindaHartDesigns.com  ISO 320 - 33mm - f-4.0 - 1/800 - Manual Mode

The very sweet Linda Hart of Linda Hart Designs - www.LindaHartDesigns.com 

ISO 320 - 33mm - f-4.0 - 1/800 - Manual Mode

This portrait of Linda was very promising, I was able to recover a lot of the highlights behind her to a level that I would normally wish. 

*Hint - Taking photos of a business card ensures you will not lose it or it will not get sweaty and crumple in your pocket!

Redbard Collections - www.RedBarnCollections.com | ISO 320 - 28mm - f/4.0 - 1/160 - Manual Mode

Redbard Collections - www.RedBarnCollections.com | ISO 320 - 28mm - f/4.0 - 1/160 - Manual Mode

www.VinyliciousDesigns.com | ISO 320 - 31mm - f/4.0 - 1/320 - Manual Mode

www.VinyliciousDesigns.com | ISO 320 - 31mm - f/4.0 - 1/320 - Manual Mode

Using the swivel screen for this portrait I was able to get a good angle of the products on the table as well as a good portrait of my subject. Shot at just above my waist level.

**When shooting from the hip so to speak, saying "eyes on me" doesn't really work anymore since "me" means my face rather the camera, that is no longer... At my face.

Ben's Brew operator pours me a sample of the cold brew coffee selection at the market. Totally bought some, super tasty.

A mix of Manual and AV mode - Edited to recover what highlights are possible. A very good test of the strong contrast in the midday sun.

ISO 320 - 57mm - f/3.5 - 1/250 - Manual Mode - Swivel screen overhead.

ISO 320 - 57mm - f/3.5 - 1/250 - Manual Mode - Swivel screen overhead.

A note with this shot, using the swivel screen overhead and getting a better view, there is one thing I noticed.

Click to enlarge. 

Obviously a lens issue, not really the body, but a testament to the sensor in the 6Dii maybe? (I am no expert) 

You can see that this lens produced some magenta fringing on the border of this white tent overhang. Yet with a click in Adobe Lightroom CC under 'Lens Correction | Defringe"...

Click to enlarge

Boom! ... It's gone.

I continue on... 

And I stop at 'The Soap Lady' tent and cannot help but take some photos of the colorful soaps and bathbombs that are all over the table.

ISO 320 - 28mm - f/3.5 - 1/500 - Manual Mode

I also stop by the Pioneer Valley tent with Wayne and take a few shots. 

ISO 320 - 24mm - f/3.5 - 1/800 - Manual Mode

A note of the shots below, while using live view I was taking a more candid shot of this honey vendor. I noticed that the live view focus really wanted to grab the closest object in the frame (the man's black sleeve). Even after lifting my finger and pressing down again, set to "one-shot" it refocused 2-3 times on the sleeve. 

Only after I used my thumb on the screen to refocus on the woman's face did it relent and keep that for the next few shots. Even though these are not really "keepers" it was a nice thing to learn and I can anticipate later when it is more important to get the shot in focus.

Stopping at the coffee truck 'BUZZED' I ask the barista inside for her portrait and she graciously agrees to pop out for a quick shot. 

This was a great look at the cameras abilities, I had to balance the shiny white surface of the truck to the left, the shaded face of the barista from the overhang above and you can still make out a tiny bit of the interior of the truck as I lifted the shadows a tad.

ISO - 38mm - f/3.5 - 1/320 - Manual Mode

ISO - 38mm - f/3.5 - 1/320 - Manual Mode

These next images are probably the best example of how the 6D mark II handles very strong, very direct sunlight, with reflective objects and materials.

As a bystander, I approach a melted cheese sandwich stand. The sun is beating down directly over head with a slight tilt, the vendor has a slab of cheese tilted toward the camera, there is white cloth around, all this light is being reflected harshly. 

I decided to include some SOOC (Stright Out Of Camera) and some final / edited images to show the range.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

I continue on again, I find a beer vendor. I love this test subject. I see that there is one person inside of the cart, ready to dispense some brew, one person standing outside. The difference on their exposure is very apparent, one completely in shadows and the other in the direct sunlight.

Here are those shots from 'The Bootlegger' beer vendor at the market.

Some more portraits of some kids in the shade...

Some dads with their kids and food...

ISO 320 - 35mm - f/5.6 - 1/160 - Manual Mode

Panda Propaganda has some sweet T's for sale and I grabbed a portrait of the owner.

ISO 320 - 24mm - f/5.6 - 1/160 - Manual Mode

Another direct sunlight test of this awesome couple...

One over exposed and brought down... One under exposed and brought up.

Can you tell which?

Stopped by Zach Martinez' plot with his sweet glassware and cuts made from liquor bottles. 

www.ZaxWorx.com

At last I have made it through the entire market, grabbed a ton of portraits and challenged the camera, lens and I hope I have shown what is the range within Lightroom.

But as I get my bike, and start to head out, I see a musician on the side walk... I love taking photos of musicians and cannot help but take one more photo. 

ISO 320 - 39mm - f/5.6 - 1/200 - Manual Mode

Portrait of the talented Liza Hedges (@SLC_Accordion)


Phewww... 


OK, now that is quite a lot of photos. I hope that this has been helpful to see the range and capability of the newly released Canon 6D Mark II. 

I definitely know that everyone shoots differently, everyone edits differently, maybe some will not find the swivel screen useful? I do because being over 6'4'' I can lower my shot to my waist without bending over or dropping to my knees or I can easily raise my view above everyone for a different vantage.

My overall takeaways

- This camera handles very much like the original 6D, weight and grip are almost identical.

- The controls are almost the exact same, the only difference I noticed have to do with the focusing system.

The button to change focus area next to the shutter is awkward to my hands, I am not sure yet if it is becuase of the position, because it is new to me or simply I am so used to the toggle switch for the same function on the 5D Mark IV (Pictured Below)

- The camera has great auto focus overall, accurate and hits almost every time. The quirk to get used to is the very centralized cluster of AF points in the viewfinder and the tendencies of the LCD screen while in Live View.

- The touch AF on Live View is very quick to respond and the touch shutter is quick and accurate although I will need to play with it more to get fully comfortable.

- I do still wish there was a thumbstick for the AF points... The D-Pad works ok over all though and it is very much like the 6D

- I do wish there were two SD card slots...

Nikon D600/D610, Nikon D750, Canon 7D, Canon 7D II, Canon 1Ds III, Canon 5D III, Sony A6500, Fuji XT2, Fuji X-Pro2, Olympus OM-D E-M1 II, and so on... All camera bodies of similar or lower price that have dual card slots. Full Frame or not, this is a loss for the consumer. 

- I still do not care about the limited video functions... I do not use nor care about 4K video.

- I do think this camera should have been released at $1699 or so. The willful limitations placed on this model in comparison to other manufacturers offerings in the same price range are very hard to ignore.

- I do think the defense for Canon with people stating "well, it is an entry level full frame"... "it isn't for professional use" etc... etc... Is silly. It's professional, if you are doing professional work with it... A Rebel T3 can be professional if you're getting paid for the work...

But all that said? I will be keeping this body, it is a great 2nd body to my 5D IV, it IS better than the 6D albeit not as much as a lot of people would have liked. 

Personally I have too much Canon gear or Canon compatible gear to think about "jumping ship" ... I would just be losing money, I would have to get used to another system, I might miss work in the time it woud take to switch, and really would I take better images with another camera or should I just work with the tools I have?


Did I miss anything? Do you have any questions?     What other content would you like to see here?

Take a second and comment here or reach out to me on social media! 

Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer 

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

Portrait of an Artist - Heather Mahler

In This post I wanted to give some behind the scenes views on how I captured the portrait of artist Heather Mahler (@heathermahler88).

With her work being on the cover and featured in the August Issue of SLUG Magazine, I was approached to capture a portrait for this artist to be included in the final piece.

BEFORE THE SHOOT...

I was given the details of the shoot: date, time, location. The selected is the SLUG Magazine Downtown Office during the day.  I was informed I may only have 10-20 minutes to capture the 4-5 vertical and horizontal shots required and I like to do 1-2 or more locations for varity when available. My thought process for this was to bring a portable light and take some portraits on the backdoor/walkway area just in the rear of the magazine's office. And then if time permitted, a shot or two in the front of the office near the front door with some really nice window lighting courtesy of the awesome frosted glass panels.

(Gear Listed At The Bottom)

THE SHOOT...

I arrive 15 minutes early as I was well aware that the parking around this street would take a second to find a spot. I park and grab my gear, heading into the office I say hello to the staff and they tell me that I can use whatever space I need. I head to the back and start scoping out the available area.

There was this awesome exposed brick wall with a few spray paint marks that looked exactly like frames, I thought this would be a great spot. I took my light and set it on the stand and tossed the umbrella on. I take a shot to test the TTL connection. Looks good.

Heather had arrived and I made my way back inside to introduce myself. I explained that I had arrived a tad early and planned out the two locations. She follows me outside and I tell her what I am thinking and show her the spot on the wall I would have her stand in front of.

We take a few shots.

I take a few shots of the same pose, I take a step back and zoom in or out. I wanted to keep the close up shots around 35-50mm and the wider ones between 24-35mm.

*Hint the shot displayed with Heather's hands over her head, adjusting her hat was actually one of the first shots taken. I had told her I was taking a test shot and to ignore me for a few seconds as she just took a second to herself. Even though I had already tested the light, I got that shot, and it is one of my favorites.

We move back inside and head to the front where I had seen the window, the front door and the lighting from the frosted glass panes, I opted to leave the flash out of these shots as the window was lighting everything pretty evenly as is...

I tell her that my idea was to play with the backlighting from the window itself and have her stand right in front of the pane, just a foot away as to separate her from it. With her positioned so the frame of the shot avoids the white wooden window frame, I take a few shots.

I tell her that my idea was to play with the backlighting from the window itself and have her stand right in front of the pane, just a foot away as to separate her from it. With her positioned so the frame of the shot avoids the white wooden window frame, I take a few shots.

Now to give an idea of what I shoot like, I might just at first tell my subject something like "just relax, I am going to take a quick test shot", take a few shots... Then perhaps guide my subject a little with simple suggestions such as "ok, eyes on me" (this makes the model usually leave their body, neck and face in the same direction it was, and then turning their gaze at me). And I try not to just shoot in an awkward silence, so I will describe what I am doing such as "just keep that, I will take a shot and then back up to get another angle", "chin up, and forward a tad", etc. 

Keeping these simple directions and keeping that line of communication open, I love to keep a light, stress free shoot and get some natural expressions.

Next shot... I wanted to use the solid background of the plain gray metal door. More real feeling, not the backlit, almost invisible feel of the frosted window. At the same time, changing the direction of light falling on the subject by lighting the subject's left side from the window and ambient light from the interior office for the right side.

I place her a foot away from the door, this gives her separation from the background, yet you can still see there is a solid surface behind her and her hat is tilting up and not touching the door (all subjects want to just line up pushed against a wall like you are a firing squad). 

With the same natural light, I change some settings as the subject is not backlit anymore, and take a few shots. 

*Note: Absolutely I have, for all of these portraits, gone for a more "headshot" look, keeping the environment out of the shots, isolating the subject shot chest to head etc. The reasoning being that I am not wanting to get the SLUG Magazine offices in the shot, why would I? It is not the artists studio, it isn't her home and I feel it would detract from the portrait and take away the focus of attention from the subject. And two... I do not know this artist, I do not know her tastes, I do not know her sense of humor. I have met her after I was sent an email and shook hands. Having to interact during the shoot itself I feel that if I am being friendly and getting my subject to be natural, we are able to see their personality through the images themselves and not as stated before, the environment and or her supplies, props, etc...

AFTER THE SHOOT...

We are done! I have what I need for the issue, period I am just about over the time agreed upon, so I thank my subject for that a time and tell them that I had a blast, which I did.

I pack up my gear and head out for the next adventure. 

Now July, a few weeks later, I get to see the result of my work. The issue is release and one of my portraits have been selected to be included in the feature.

Some other Final Images.


Gear Used:

Please use these links to view the product's details and remember that purchases through these links will help me out. Thanks!

Camera: Canon 5D Mark IV

Lens: Canon 24-70 f/2.8 USM II

Light Source: Canon 600EX-RT (Flash/Speedlight)

Trigger: Yongnuo YN-E3-RT for Speedlights

Light Stand: Impact C-Stand with head and arm

Light Modifier: 43" Umbrella Softbox ...

Manfrotto Swivel Mount & Cold Shoe Mount


Did I miss anything? Do you have any questions?     What other content would you like to see?

Take a second and comment here or reach out to me on social media! Questions very much welcome!

Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer 

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

Proper Portraits - Proper Brewing Co.

On location at Proper Brewing Co.

A newly opened brewery in downtown Salt Lake City. I have been asked by SLUG Magazine to get some portraits of the beer experts for the their Beer Issue.

BEFORE THE SHOOT...

I was given a date, time and address to show up and I was just unaware of the exact shooting conditions. I knew I had to capture portraits of three people, I brought...

- My giant Photek Softliter Umbrella 60"

Xplor 600 Monolight

Impact C-Stand with Arm

Kupo C-Stand Wheel Base for easier movement.

- My trusty Canon 5DIV

Canon 6D a (as a back-up)

- Canon 24-70 f2.8 II

I also always have a back-up lighting source with my Canon 600ex RT speedlight, always tucked away in the bag just in case the location is not large enough for the giant 60" light modifier. Additionally I had...

Manfrotto Carbon Fiber Tripod

- Manfrotto 498RC2 ball-head if need be for a slower shutter speed and if not used for that, I could get some bts video with a simple Smartphone Tripod Mount. I keep and lug around all my camera gear inside a Lowepro AW 200 Messenger style bag (Awesome freaking bag). 

I was now prepared for 1. any lighting conditions with my large and smaller back up light source. 2. Zoomed in or wide shot to accommodate those same space variables with the 24-70 lens. And 3. With the 5D iv, and the dual pixel AF I could use the rear screen if needed to frame and focus any shot that placed me in a way that I was unable to use the viewfinder. 

ARRIVING ON LOCATION...

Upon arrival I grabbed my gear and entered the building. The front of the building was an open bar/eatery set up and I gave a few seconds to access my options for a few shots....

Thinking to myself (ok... there is a pool table... arcade... open area... high, long table...)
**Note: After a few minutes I realized I had just been brainstorming in vain. This was not the pre-decided location for the shoot, but rather the rear of the building, with the brewing vats and other contextually accurate pieces for the shoot. Never the less, do not ever stop planning shoots in your head, looking at lighting, ideas! Always getting ideas!

I was greeted by my group of subjects and I was invited to see the location of the actual shoot down the hallway. I grabbed my C-stand and wheeled my gear down and into the back-room.

John Kern, one of my subjects makes sure there is no water on the floor and the room was ok to shoot in.

John Kern, one of my subjects makes sure there is no water on the floor and the room was ok to shoot in.

Chosen background with the direction of light from the windows across the room.

Chosen background with the direction of light from the windows across the room.

I really liked the angle at which they pushed away from where I would place the subjects, the light from the window in the other room giving a nice, cooler quality to the ambient light. I am ready to get some shots.

SHOOTING...

I tell my subject what I am thinking, that I would love a casual portrait of them sipping a little sample of beer with a slight 'cheers' gesture perhaps? They make a joke about posing like Captain Morgan with a leg up on a barrell and I take a few test shots. 

Captain Morga pose

Captain Morga pose

Test shot to get the lighting just right.

Test shot to get the lighting just right.

After a few shots, I have the light just where I want it. I gesture to my subjects to face towards me, continuing in what pose they have naturally come upon. (Final Images At The End Of The Post).

Shooting #2...

I push my light (on wheels, so nice!) into the adjacent room and place it next to a vat (on the right of what is pictured), this gives the light some direction, looking natural as it is coming from a similar space as the window light.

I tell my subject to place themselves as they wish, suggesting perhaps to utalize the stair case, railings etc.

I take a few test shots and get things where I want them. Taking a few more shots, I tell my subjects to repeat casually talking, looking at each other, and every few seconds instructing them to have "eyes one the camera". This gives a relaxed, comfortable feel as no one is simply staring into the lens, awkwardly for a few minutes.

3E5A2637.jpg

Always with a "while we're all here, lights are already set-up" mentality, I figure I can get a few more shots even though I know I have my "Keepers" already. I have the subjects all stand and re-assemble into a sort of semicircle for a more head-shot look.

Shoot End... 

I had gotten what I need and my subjects were amazing, I thank them for their time and let them know I am done, and that I will be packing up my toys and heading out. We discuss beer for a minute and I tell them what my favorite qualities of my favorite brews are. I am graciously gifted a few recommended selections that Proper Brewing had recently been producing.

Again, thanking my subjects I gather my things and head to my car.

Final Images...

These following images were my final edits, final picks for submission to SLUG Magazine. I now just had to send them and await the issue to print. 

3E5A2621.jpg

And here are the used images in the issue and online a few weeks later.

www.slugmag.com

www.slugmag.com

.pdf copy of final issue. 

.pdf copy of final issue. 


What are some of your experiences while shooting, do you plan? Overplan? Overpack, Overshoot? Be sure to reach out and let me know or leave a comment. 

Thank You For Looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer 

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or (801) 455-9957

QUESTIONS WELCOME!!!

Give a follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

Part 3 of 3 - Swim Team Final Group Shots @ J & Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center

Part 3 of 3 

Now that we have a few groups shot, it is time for the last of the portraits and the overall group shot with over 50 swimmers.


Now with the only place you can take a photo with that many subjects is the nearby grassy incline.

With it being a sunny day, we, the subjects and the photographer have to wait for the cloud coverage to roll over head (the images above show a simple 5 minutes apart.

The set up for these shots was straightforward and I used one light source. I used a Profoto B1 and a giant shoot through umbrella to do 2 things, one light the subject to pop out from the background and two to diffuse the ever changing and at times harsh directional light from the sun (as it was 09:30a).

Here are some of those shots.


So the group shot for the full group is up next. And using the same hill but now using 2x Profoto B1 backed up from the portraits giving enough room for all the kids to herd on into the frame.

With that all to frustrating fact that you cannot control the weather let alone this many kids. You have to set up the lights, get them in line and take some shots.

Here is one of the finals shots from the day.

We wrap up the day with the late to arrive, last few portraits of the team members. Some kids are super brave and photogenic, some more nervous and need to be silly or take a shot with their friend.

Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer

be sure to let me know 

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or (801) 455-9957

Give a follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

You've scouted the wedding location? Now the wedding day!

 

So in a previous post I gave my opinion that, yes, you should absolutely scout out a location of a wedding before the day of. The practice of which can get you more prepared for an event and comfortable in knowing the physical layout, lighting, flooring, where the bathrooms are, where to park, etc.

I try do this for a lot of my shoots, and recently had a wedding at a local hotel and having visited this venue before I felt this was extremely beneficial and had a more fluid and less stress filled shoot.

1. Stairs

Since I had remembered the main staircase I was able to know where to place myself, where the couple would be headed (the main reception area to camera left) and get some great images of the couple and their procession. 

aasas.PNG

2. Reception Room

Knowing the size and layout of the room used for the main reception area I was able to find out the location for the dance floor, the size of tables (to move around with equipment) where the kitchen doors are (you do not want to block the pathway of the staff) and finally I could see the ceilings are low enough that I can bounce flash off them if needed. (Walls in the above images would not be up as staff told me).

3. Outside

The area just outside of the main reception area there is a small patio and grassy are as shown in the previous post. 

This was good to have the layout of the cement vs the grassy area as the wedding had a fire dancer for an evening display of light and danger. Being aware of the small area in which the display would be I was able to position myself near the flame and not blocked by the audience. 

So...

These and other shots throughout the night were in part captured with the knowledge that I had from a quick 10 minute trip before the event.

Do you normally scout of locations pick by clients beforehand? What is your method of preparation before a shoot? Share your thoughts below and as always.

Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer

be sure to let me know 

Contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or (801) 455-9957

Give a follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickr, Tumblr

Summer is the time of flea markets - Looking back at 2016s

I love festivals, markets and other such events that are hosted only when the weather is good.

It's a great place to get knick knacks, inspiration for photo ideas, pick up an old camera or just people watch and grab a lime-aid or such other cool drinks for the heat.

This post is a selection of images from the last flea market in the 2016 season. 

Here's looking forward to the 2017 summer!

Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer

be sure to let me know 

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or catch me at (801) 455-9957

And definitely, follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlick500pxTumblr

YES You should scout out your next wedding venue - Searching the unknown.

Whenever accepting a new job, you always should ask a few questions.

...

One of the most important questions "Where will ______ be held?"

....

So, recently I met with an amazing couple to grab a coffee and discuss their upcoming wedding. After learning the facts such as how many guests, expectations of the bride, length of the event etc... These bits of info all really effect the other important bit of info on the location/venue.

They said that there was a ceremony at a neighborhood church, and then the reception at the mountain side Marriott Hotel in Salt Lake City. 

Now, having never been to these locations I always think it is a good idea to take 20 minutes and scout out these spaces before I show up and find myself unprepared.

-The Marriott-

(From Parking Lot)

Now, so far there is nothing crazy, you have to get in there, see the available area, but at least I know where to park now.

(Scan of the lobby)

(Opposite view just over the blacony)

Now, getting the layout of the overall hotel, I can tell there is a lot of window light and spaces that I can sneak the couple out for shots when I can. 

I can place them in chairs, with and without windows open.. etc As seen below. Getting some really nice portrait set ups.

Then, the venue/main area which is on the lower level of the hotel.

The entrance is just near the fore mentioned chairs and at the bottom of this staircase.

Entering the room I was told the dividers would be up, but the room is usually un-sectioned off and ready for large groups. Pictured below, you can see the divider and the general layout of the space (what is viewed here is onnly 1/3 of the overall space.

Now... The last thing to check out is the small patio area that should be available for shooting some portraits.

(*Note these images were taken if Feb. and the event is in April, so the presence of snow is not expected the day of.) 


So what?

What does this even do, scouting a location, finding out what to expect?

Ok, well I will break down what it means to me.

1. I now know where I can park...

2. I know how far I might need to unload lights, carry bags, where I can set and set up these this as well...

3. I need to bring lights! From this mini tour I have seen that while the lobby and open area of the lower floor have a good level of light, lots from windows. Then room itself, assigned for the event has zero windows and only (warm) lighting from the ceiling...

4. There are a bunch of spots to steal the couple away for some quick portraits... 

(I can use chairs, window light, brick wall outside, the tree line outside, the archway outside, the staircase shooting up at the couple... I can put them against a blank wall I can shoot down from the top level getting them and the pattern on the carpet.)

Anyway!

Basically, I now feel more prepped for this event, I feel excited about the opportunities and the shots I can get. I know where my equipment can be set up and have that out of my mind to focus on the tasks at hand. 

Now I can get the couple, my client... The best photos I can.


Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of a Photographer,

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course,

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or catch me at (801) 455-9957

And definitely, follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlick500pxTumblr

 

Portrait of a band - WEATHERS - Salt Lake City @ The Comeplex

"We're already here, lets do it."

... That is something I say to myself or my clients on almost every shoot. 

Usually when you are getting some photos, portrait, group, family, whatever. You always have this feeling when you "have enough" or "have enough to work with", that is always a nice feeling, the I've done my job feeling.

But then you always have another idea, another location, and if you're client/subject is willing I always say ask, and ask if they have any ideas, try something new.


Always trying to keep this in mind, when I was at a concert, taking a portrait of the band Saint Motel (See blog post).

The supporting musical group WEATHERS was also there. I took the opportunity to offer to take their portrait as well.

My lights already set up, my settings dialed in. All I did was change the background and subject for a great effect.

Here are the two keepers from that 90 second shoot.


Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course,

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500pxTumblr

Portrait of a band - Saint Motel - Salt Lake City @ The Complex

Recently I had the chance to take a portrait of one of the best new bands touring today.

Saint Motel right on the heels of the release of saintmotelevision [Explicit] they stop their tour to perform in Salt Lake City Utah at the downtown venue The Complex.

I was contacted by their representation to cover this show. Having had the privilege to shoot this group before and gotten to know it's members, I jumped at the chance to cover, really focusing on a group photo that was the focus of the event.

I arrived at the venue a tad early with my lights and gear and waited to be shown the available shooting space. The idea of outside was discussed, maybe even on the tour bus? But we eventually just decided on the green room for the shoot, super casual.

The green room consisted of a few couches and a small to medium sized room.

I grab my rental D1 kit from Pictureline in Salt Lake City. Open up the case and set up only one of the monolights due to the space. One with the softbox umbrella I brought along can definitely fill the room for a group of four.

Cameron of Weathers graciously being kicked out of the space for the photo.


With only a few minutes to shoot, I quickly decided that I would use the corner, have twomembers on each side and just have them place themselves as they are no stranger to being in front of the lens. I quickly took a few test shots, chimping at the preview and then adjusting to my taste to what I knew I could work with for a great portrait.

Members of the LA band Weathers offer the space to use and leave the room for a few minutes to shoot.

Way too bright, quickly need to bring the settings in a tad.

A tad too bright, I then bring the aperture in a bit to shut out some extra exposure.

A tad too bright, I then bring the aperture in a bit to shut out some extra exposure.

Just about right, a little highlight on the skin, still some shadows and blacks, a lot to work with.


So then the guys take their places, I said whatever they wanted, throwing a few ideas out about sitting on an arm or feet on the table. But really I knew they knew what to do, they sat as they saw fit, a/j was already dressed in a coat with an umbrella form being outside. Effortless.

After a few shots I really appreciate the comfort-ability level with the shoot. I wanted to get some great shots and also be quick and get out of their hair.

These are the two "keepers" that I wanted to share.

Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course,

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500pxTumblr


Saint Motels "Move" -- See them live if you have the chance!

Love Not Hate - March for Peace in downtown SLC 11.19.16

People from Salt Lake City gather at the capitol to display their signs and their passion for spreading love over hate.

After some numbers had gathered, the group formed into a line, peacefully crossing the street and city, heading down the hill into downtown.

Making the rounds on downtown Salt Lake City. Chants of "Love is Louder than Hate!" and "We Choose Compassion!" Fill the streets.

Spreading love is an uphill affair.

Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course...

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500pxTumblr

Shooting Tegan and Sara @ In The Venue, SLC

The downtown event host, In The Venue is the spot for this show from Tegan and Sara. The indie pop duo fresh off their 8th album.

I was there to take some photos.

Lines are already formed as I walked to the venue.

Wrapping all around the outside, fans brave the wind and rain to get in to the show.

Once indie you have to make your way in and out of the crowd, passing local radio booths, merch tables and bars.

I always need to get a few fan portraits. I grab some people that either look super interesting to me or they are they type that make eye contact with me and I will grab them for a quick portrait. Here are some of those.


Then it was that time for the opening act. Shura, an English singer/songwriter that tours with a supporting band.


Then the headliners. Tegan and Sara with their touring band as well.

Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course...

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500pxTumblr

Part 2 of 3 - Swim Team Member Portraits @ J & Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center

Continuing with part 2 of this overall shoot experience...

After initial group portraits, parents eagerly wait in the sidelines for the next stage. individual portraits.


I start immediately after the group shot by moving my lighting set up to a more closed off corner just a few feet away (pictured below). With a nice green and pink floral background and soft light in the shadows of the building I line up the subjects for their portraits.

Metering for the background again, and allowing the quick and reliable TLL capabilities of the Profoto B2 kit I had the few brave young subjects step into my makeshift studio and make their experience fun.

As like the other group photographs taken this day, slight adjustments were made for exposure, warmth and adjusting the tone cure slightly for effect.


Stay Tuned!

For part 3 of three which will cover the giant group portrait of over fifty kids! As well as the remaining single portraits.


Thanks for looking!

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course...

If you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500pxTumblr

Part 1 of 3 - Swim Team Photos @ J & Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center

This summer I had the opportunity to take some portraits of the youth swim teams at the IJ & Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center... 

I had a great experience and wanted to share some of my steps in preparing, capturing and editing these images.


Having taken portraits of various sizes of teams, families and concert goers, I took this opportunity to expand my skills in large group portraiture. This was a shoot that needed minutes of research as the size of the group and the location of the shoot were at the time unknown.

The area available to me being the community center pool area, I decided to both arrive early and I also used google earth to get some ideas as to where to place my subjects and my lighting set up.

Not knowing if the pool area would be totally crowded or chairs laid out all over. I thought that the best staging area would be the top of the pool's swim lanes (as highlighted in red). A straight line to arrange the subjects and with the pool as the background there was just enough space for my lighting set up and camera.

I arrived about 20 minutes early with the need to set up and get some last minute checks out of the way. I found myself with 4-5 feet of room for each group another 2-3 feet for lighting and tripod. I checked my batteries, set up lights and roughly composed my shot.

Set up was:

 1) Photoflex Reflective Umbrella 2) 71 inch shoot though umbrella from Neewer 3) Profoto B2 Location Kit (rental from local store Pictureline: Kit including Manfrotto lightstands, B2 heads) 4) Sandbags: *Must have especially when outdoors and with wind catching umbrellas near a pool.... 5) Lowpro Backpack of mine propped on the bigger lightstand for added weight on this stand with the massive modifier. 

Lastly with my camera (not pictured because I took the picture with it.) A Canon 6D with a Tamron 24-70 f/2.8 zoom lens.

Swim Teams' POV of the set up.

As shown in the EXIF data from the image below, I was in manual mode, had an aperture of f/6.3 for deep enough for focus on a small group at the focal length of 27mm while still having a reasonably fast shutter speed of  1/160. I arrived at these settings by metering for the sky behind the group allowing for the blues to be visible and highlights not blown out. Then letting the TTL capable Profoto B2 pop off as much light as needed to light my subjects.

*A helpful aspect of the shoot: Talking with the coaches before and during the shoot. I observed that the swim teams looked up to and followed instructions of their adult teachers very well. I was easily able to have the attention of the group and have them at ease (for a few minutes anyway). We took a bunch of shots rapid fire asking for both "serious" faces as well as a "crazy face" (as seen in final gallery). 

As for editing the images:

Below is a straight out of camera (SOOC) image. You can see that overall exposure is pretty decent, only a few tweak are necessary as well as a quick straightening and removal of two life guards that I had failed to account for while focused on my subjects.

Making a few basic changes such as a slight reduction in overall exposure, bringing down the highlights and whites to give details back and adjusting the tone curve to fit my tastes. With a dash of warmth to compensate for the early morning blue hue I have create what I think is a solid portrait of these kids that in my mind would hang on their parents walls for all eternity. 

With this similar formula repeated in a few of my "keepers" from the shoot, here are a few of the finals that were sent to the client for your viewing pleasure.

STAY TUNED for Part 2 and 3 of this overall JCC Swim Team Shoot.

Up Next: Solo Swim Team Member Portraits.


Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course...

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500pxTumblr

Hip Hop and Beat Box Competition - Downtown SLC

I recently was hired to take capture some of this locally arranged, locally performed. Hip Hop and Beat Box Competition. 

Video and photos of the event overall are posted below.

Enjoy.

Thanks for looking!

If you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course...

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET 

or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on

 InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500pxTumblr

 

Family Portraits - Locations, Lighting and Equipment

Taking family photos is always a different experience, out of a studio, in a new space with multiple variables. This blog post should serve as an example in some things that you might run into and have to adapt to as your shoot progresses.

One such instance was earlier this year. At a families home, they arranged the shoot to coincide with their newborns first birthday. There are many people around as they had me arrive and some of the next points are just some of the things you have to be aware of.

Equipment used:
Softbox 24" x 36" with Grid
Canon 600ex RT Speedlight
Heavyduty Saddlebag Sandbag
Yongnuo Transceiver of YN622 YN-622C (x2)
Tamron SP 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD
Canon 6D

1. When shooting in a new location, or an uncontrolled location, you have to adapt and go with your best option.

Now with this particular house, there was a front yard and a back yard as options as the house is not well lit and has guests. With party supplies all over the back yard and a patio taking up most of the available space (marked in yellow) the only option seemed the front fence side corner of the property. (Marked in red). (Images via google maps)

2. Position and Lighting

I grabbed a light stand weighted down with the sandbag and set up my collapsible soft box, mounting in the trigger and speedlight.

Now that I have the scene set, I am using TTL through the Yongnuo controllers and the speedlight, metering off the subjects face and simply using the exposure lock button.

Which brings me to the third and final point.

3. Time, Location & Light Available  

The last thing and really sometimes the least important part of a client's shoot. Variables you cannot control i.e. clients schedule, the amount of time you have to shoot, location and what time of day, these are technically out of your control and just what you have to adapt to.

This particular shoot the variables included. 

Time of shoot 12-1pm, shooting around the babies nap time ending, limited space/background options, budget not including rental of larger lighting source, 10-15 minutes total shoot time in-between food preparation and entertaining guests.

With these factors you have to improvise and use previous experience to get the shots you were hired for.

Here are some of those images.

Thanks for looking!

Be sure to let me know your thoughts and of course.

Thanks for looking, if you are in need of Photography,

Be sure to contact me at LOGAN@LMSORENSON.NET or at (801) 455-9957

And follow on InstagramTwitterFacebookFlickrCrated500px, Tumblr